Delicious Bookmark Sharing for Franchises

In 2011 Steve Chen and Chad Hurley, the creators of YouTube, purchased the already popular social bookmarking site delicious.com with plans to transform it into a social bookmarking destination using the same talents that enabled them to sell their last creation to Google for 1.65 billion dollars.

Social bookmarking is a simple and powerful way for franchises to organize and share notable web resources by depositing them in a business intelligence bank. Useful “landmark pages” discovered during your staff’s daily web browsing activity are remembered, organized and shared, forming a sort of “intranet.”

High Touch High Tech (ht2) research has shown that a large share of web researchers use Delicious bookmarks for sales presentations, social media content, and direct site links. Thus it makes sense for franchises and their franchisees to bookmark their own web pages to spread the word, increase search engine rank, and potentially create viral web traffic boons. Find out more about the ht2 marketing team and all they are doing to maximize their franchisees’ income potential.

Signing Up Through Facebook & Twitter

When you sign up with Facebook or Twitter, Delicious will import your name, username, and if you’re connecting with Facebook, your email address. This means you won’t have to connect to them later. Delicious will also import links you share on the service you connected to.

By default, links imported from Facebook or Twitter are set to private. You can change your default setting or disconnect from connected accounts in your account settings.

If you don’t want to use this feature, simply use a separate email and password when you register for your account and bypass the import features.

Connecting Delicious to Facebook

The “Remember” Bookmark Stream

One of the most intuitive aspects of Delicious profiles is the chronological order of bookmarking. Think Facebook Timeline. Gone is the necessity to save bookmarks into folders and order them manually. Delicious keeps your links in tidy chronological order; how often do you want to revisit the most important links from yesterday’s browsing? This is superior to a browser’s own bookmark and history features because your Remember page can be accessed from any desktop browser, tablet, or phone without having to slog through the chronically flawed import/export ritual which routinely mangles the pristine folder hierarchy you have so carefully crafted!

If you find the service as valuable as I think you will and would like to import your browser’s bookmarks, the Delicious help files will walk you through the process.

Delicious Profile Page - Remember Tab

Tagging

Organizing links into “Folders” is done quickly and easily by adding tags to each link when you add it. Each tag describes the subject matter or use of the page. When you tag a link, Delicious creates a new “bucket” of links on the left side of your profile page. You can organize the buckets by alphabet or number of links per bucket.

Sharing Features

The magic of working with Delicious bookmarks in franchise operations happens with the Network feature. Just like Twitter and Facebook, you can follow team members so that you’re privy to the public links that they are adding. On the Remember tab you will retain your personal collection, while on the Network tab you will see all tags added by team members you are following. As you peruse the franchise’s storehouse of links, you can easily copy a link of interest to your own collection by clicking the plus symbol. Again, these links will be organized by tag.

Delicious.com -- Recommended People

Designate a branded tag for operations purposes. Whenever a team member adds a bookmark of franchise relevance, they add the designated tag. This way, when fellow team members add that link to their profile, it will be organized by and accessible through the tag name showing on their page. All franchise-related tags adopted from team members’ profiles will be accessible by clicking the designated tag link. Quick. Easy. Dynamic. Timely.

Private Bookmarking

Whenever a franchise staff member adds a bookmark with the Private box checked, it will not appear on the Network tab and will not be visible to outside users at large.

Take advantage of all of these Delicious features and watch your staff get smarter and more unified as they share knowledge in an organized, fun, and social way!

To learn more about franchise opportunities with High Touch High Tech, visit us online at ScienceMadeFunFranchise.net.

High Touch High Tech is the leader in innovative hands-on science and nature experiences for children, serving over 4 million children annually with 27 franchise locations across the United States, Canada, Turkey, Singapore and South Korea.

The Five Broad Strokes of Marketing

A lot of marketing theory confuses people because it’s more complicated than it has to be. While wondrous new technologies can help you in your mission of raising your profits, marketers don’t let those technologies blur that mission. Keeping it simple is a powerful competitive advantage when it comes to speed and profitability.

The seller is happy when the buyer is happy. So make as many buyers happy as you can. That requires quality and service, but that’s why you’re here — and it’s not complicated. It starts out with a defined marketing strategy.

 

The entire process is made up of five broad strokes. Take those strokes and add as many bells, whistles, systems, technologies, apps and economic doodads as you want — but be sure that all five broad strokes are taken. Do that and you’ll never think that marketing has to be anything that Simple Simon couldn’t handle with his right hand tied behind him.

 

1. Listen to find a problem you can solve. The first broad stroke doesn’t require any of your hands — only your ears. The first broad stroke is your ability to listen. Be alert for problems. Be alert in social situations and the social media. Be alert in the attention you pay to the mass media. Are people talking about problems they have, problems that need solving?

Zero in on the problems that don’t yet have solutions. Pick a problem that you can solve. That’s how you respond to opportunity.

2. Pricing the solution. The second broad stroke is determining how much it will cost you to solve that problem. Maybe you can solve it with information and with service. If not, how much will it cost you to make it or buy it? Be very careful with this step, as with all the broad strokes, to overlook nothing. Broad strokes tend to magnify errors, so you don’t want to make even the most minor mistake.

3. Marketing. When you tally the costs of producing your offering, don’t overlook the costs of marketing it. And don’t overlook the necessity to market it.

If you build a better mousetrap, the world won’t beat a path to your door unless they know about that mousetrap. They learn about it from your marketing.

If you’ve come up with a truly nifty solution, the marketing for it will catch wind and fan out to others who have long been searching for a solution. It’s nice work if you can get it, and you can get it if you market.

It is now well understood why people patronize the businesses that they do. It’s known that they favor products and services that they trust, a human characteristic that has given rise to a phenomenon called “branding.” Branding helps people trust you. One of the jobs of a marketer is to convince customers to trust his or her offering.

Of course, quality is one of the factors that earn trust. And that’s why it’s part of the third broad stroke. Another factor that gains gobs of trust — and gives the little guy an edge over the big guy — is the ability to service what he sells. Don’t forget that one of your sacred goals is make your customers happy. Terrific service does just that.

4. Service what you sell. Terrific service is not necessarily free for you to provide. And yes, it does require effort. In particular, it requires a person who wants to deliver it and doesn’t do it just because he’s supposed to.

Factor in the cost of service right along with the cost of marketing and cost of goods. But be sure you are engaged in a business that you find worthwhile, or that you are passionate or enthusiastic about. Don’t forget enthusiasm is contagious!

5. Earn profits. The fifth broad stroke is what marketing should be all about. Not sales. Not store traffic. Not turnover. Not responses to an offer. Not hits to a website. Not awards. Not sales records. Not any metric you can name. That fifth broad stroke is profits, what’s left over after you’ve deducted the cost of everything else in your business. No matter how glowing the other numbers in your business may be, it’s the profits that should glow, that keep you in business, that enable you to grow your business, that attract investors, that entice buyers of companies, and that ought to be the prime reason you went into business.

It’s your job to grow healthy profits every year. You owe that to yourself, your employees, your family, and your future. That’s why profits best reflect your success. Profits are elusive. Profits are honest. Profits are hard-earned. But profits are not complicated.

They are the fifth of the five broad strokes of success, and they are crucial to your company’s health. But earning them is not a winding road. Instead it is a straight road, possibly uphill, but always leading to exactly where you envision going.

To learn more about franchise opportunities with High Touch High Tech, visit us online at ScienceMadeFunFranchise.net.

High Touch High Tech is the leader in innovative hands-on science and nature experiences for children, serving over 4 million children annually with 27 franchise locations across the United States, Canada, Turkey, Singapore and South Korea.

Facebook Ad Targeting for Franchises

Franchises which draw their consumer base from specific demographics will get all the traditional benefits of Pay Per Click (PPC) advertising with facebook ads while keeping costs low. You are able to choose the location, gender, age, likes and interests, relationship status, workplace and education of your target audience.

Since your ad will only be shown to users relevant to your target criteria, the number of clicks will be lower and the quality of users visiting your promotions will be much higher. Ask your franchise marketing team if they provide systems or guides to empower your social media advertising campaigns.

Interests Targeting

Interest targeting helps franchises target facebook users based on information they’ve added to their timeline and profile. This considers information such as the pages they like, apps they use and other information.

Facebook Interests Settings

Facebook Ad Interests Targeting

For example, High Touch High Tech franchisees specialize in fun and educational science programs for kids. So franchisees might display their ads to users who have shown an interest in general science topics, science education, parenting, and teaching. Interests targeting will help them reach those customers most likely to make a program reservation.

Intrigued? Meet our franchisees to see if investing in a Science Made FUN! franchise is right for you.

Age & Birthday Targeting

Birthday targeting lets you create ads that are targeted to people who have a birthday in the next week. This helps you create highly relevant ads or highlight special discounts, offers or promotions that are available to people on their birthdays.

Facebook Age & Birthday Settings

Facebook Ad Age & Birthday Targeting

Location Targeting

If your franchise business sells primarily to your local community, location targeting is right for you.

You can target by:

• Countries

• Specific radius from city

• Zip code Facebook Location Settings

Facebook Location Settings

Facebook Ad Location Settings

To learn more about franchise opportunities with High Touch High Tech, visit us online at ScienceMadeFunFranchise.net.

High Touch High Tech is the leader in innovative hands-on science and nature experiences for children, serving over 4 million children annually with 27 franchise locations across the United States, Canada, Turkey, Singapore and South Korea.